EXAMINING PSYCHO-SOCIAL FACTORS AND COMMUNITY MITIGATION PRACTICES TO LIMIT THE SPREAD OF COVID-19: EVIDENCE FROM NIGERIA

Authors: Ekundayo Shittu, Funmilayo Adewumi, Nkemdilim Ene, Somto Chloe Keluo-Udeke and Chizoba Wonodi.
Abstract

We examine the psychosocial factors influencing community adoption of non-pharmaceuticalinterventions (NPI) to limit the spread of COVID-19. Using data from 990 respondents in communitiesacross Nigeria, we examine the correlation of health behaviors and socioeconomic indicators. Weconduct logistic regression to estimate the relationship between mask wearing as a health-seekingNPI with demographic and socioeconomic variables. We estimate separate models in the sensitivityrobustness checks with other NPIs and control for differences across sex, age, education, numberin household, and the presence of a student in the respondent’s household. A crucial finding isthat health-seeking NPI behaviors are statistically significantly affected in different ways by themenu of socioeconomic indicators. The control for age, sex, education, and household size indicatesthat there is intersectionality of how these factors influence specific mitigation practices. We findthat women are more likely to engage in mask wearing, hand washing, and use of hand sanitizersand tissues than men, and the provision of palliatives and access to family supplies significantlyenhances community mitigation. Palliatives and access to family supplies enhance most healthseeking behaviors. The implication for pandemic mitigation policy is that minimizing incidence ratesrequires having responsive initiatives such as information updates on pandemic progression.

Keywords: Non-pharmaceutical intervention (NPI); COVID-19; mitigation practices; Nigeria; health policy
Link: https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10030585